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NWŌ Street names

These street names are predominantly names of rangatira, tūpuna and/or places of high regard to Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei.

Apihai Apihai Street Named after the Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei paramount chief Apihai Te Kawau. Apihai Te Kawau gifted over 3,000 acres to the crown for the establishment of Auckland City. He was the grandson of prominent Ngāti Whātua chief Tuperiri. Many of the senior lines of Ngāti Whātua and Tāmaki Makaurau converged upon him, hence he was called ‘the man of many cousins.’ He is most well-known for his skills in combat and warfare and signing the Treaty of Waitangi on the 20th of March, 1840. Apihai Street is located in Orākei. Awarau Awarua Crescent Awarua was a significant chief, the son of Tāhuri, whose renowned gardens were at Maungakiekie. His daughter Tanu, married Tomoaure a son of Tuperiri and their son was Arama Karaka an original trustee of the Orākei Block. Awarua crescent is situated near Ngāpipi road in Orākei. Māhuhu Māhuhu Crescent Māhuhu Crescent is in the Auckland CBD. It is named after Māhuhu-ki-te-rangi which is the primary ancestral canoe of Ngāti Whātua. The captain of Māhuhu-ki-te-rangi was Rongomai, son of Whakatau Pōtiki, who sailed on this waka from Hawaiki to Aotearoa. Alongside Tangihua and Tāpora Street, Māhuhu Crescent plays an important role in displaying Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei’ as ahi kā in Tāmaki Makaurau, particularly in the Auckland CBD. Ngāoho Ngāoho Street Ngāoho Street is named after an ancient tribe of Auckland and is one of the three hapū of Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei. Ngāpipi Ngāpipi Road Ngāpipi Road is located in Orākei, Auckland. Ngāpipi Road is named after Ngāpipi Reweti, an enigmatic and controversial figure in the iwi. His great-grandfather, Reweti Tamahiki, was one of the original 15 Trustees of the inalienable Orākei Block. Ngāpipi was involved in a number of actions that resulted in land being lost to Crown and Council. He sold his land interests though also appeared in numerous court actions to protect the Orākei Block. Pāora Pāora Street Pāora Street is in Orākei and is named after Pāora Tūhaere. He was an enthusiastic advocate of the Christian faith and it is well known that keeping the peace was his key objective. Pāora Tūhaere was one of the Ngāti Whātua leaders who opposed the individualization of land at Orākei as his Uncle Te Kawau before him. Rewiti Rewiti Street Rewiti (sic), is named after Te Reweti whose mother was Atareta and a nephew of Apihai Te Kawau. He signed the Treaty of Waitangi on March 20 and famously led a delegation to Kororareka to entice Governor Hobson to Tāmaki. Tangihua Tangihua Street Tangihua Street is located in the Auckland CBD and is named after the taniwha Tangihua. Tangihua was a guardian or kaitiaki of the waka Māhuhu-ki-te-rangi whilst in the Kaipara Harbour. Alongside Māhuhu Crescent and Tāpora Street, Tangihua reinforces Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei as ahi kā in Tāmaki Makaurau, particularly the Auckland CBD. Tāpora Tāpora Street Tāpora Street is located in the Auckland CBD. It is named after the area Tāporapora in the Kaipara Harbour where the Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei waka Māhuhu-ki-te-rangi docked. It is said that Māhuhu-ki-te-rangi overturned at Tāporapora which would eventually kill its captain, Rongomai. Hence the Ngati Whātua kōrero “Tāporapora whakatahuri waka whakarere wahine” (Tāporapora which overturns canoes and leaves women bereft). Alongside Māhuhu Crescent and Tangihua Street, Tāpora indicates Ngāti Whātua Ōrākei as ahi kā in Tāmaki Makaurau, particularly the Auckland CBD. Tautari Tautari Street Tautari Street is named after Wātene Tautari, an original Trustee of the Orākei Block. As a youth, he witnessed the arrival of Governor Hobson to Okahu Bay in the summer of 1841 where over 1,000 Ngāti Whātua had gathered to welcome him. He passed away in 1933 at the age of 99. Tautari street is in Orākei, Auckland. Tītai Tītai Street Tītai Street is located in Orākei, just off Paritai Drive. It is named after Tītahi, a great tohunga and chief of the 14th century. Tītahi had been killed at Onepuwhakatakataka (Hobson Point) whilst defending that pā in the 1400’s. It was he who instructed the people of Tāmaki in the art of Māori Pā and Kainga design and engineering as displayed on the great volcanic cones of Tāmaki. Tūhaere Tūhaere Street Tūhaere St is located in Orākei off one of Auckland’s most renowned streets Paritai Drive. Tūhaere street is named after Ngāti Whātua rangatira Pāora Tūhaere who lead the iwi following the death of his uncle Apihai Te Kawau. He was known for his ability to adjudicate tense situations and was ‘a friend of both Māori and Pākehā’ as noted on his headstone at the Okahu Urupa. Tuperiri Tuperiri Road Tuperiri Rd is located in Epsom, Auckland. It is named after the Te Taoū chief Tuperiri who lead the occupying Ngāti Whātua forces following their invasion of Tāmaki. Tuperiri lived on his pā, Hikurangi, which was based on Maungakiekie (One Tree Hill). All those who descend and whakapapa to Tuperiri make up the three hapū of Ngāti Whātua – Ngā Oho, Te Taoū and Te Uringutu. Watene Watene Crescent Watene Cresent is named after Watene Tautari, an original Trustee of the Orākei block. As a youth he witnesses the arrival of Governor Hobson to Okahu Bay in the summer of 1841 where over 1000 Ngāti Whātua had gathered to welcome him. He passed away in 1933 at the age of 99.

He pānui: Aotearoa is at Alert Level 2, with extra restrictions in Tāmaki Makaurau.

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